Home Appliances and Whiteware Industry Report – NZ SEO Reach

published by on 27th March 2015 under Industry Reports, Research

Searching for Home Appliances Online

For the full report (PDF) please use our download form

Which New Zealand Home Appliance stores are maximising their market share online?

Find out which online home appliance and whiteware stores are taking the lead in organic search and how they’re doing it.

FIRST has investigated the organic search engine rankings for NZ consumer searches focused on buying home appliances and whiteware, utilising FIRST’s Ranking Based Reach (RBR) analysis framework. In addition, a consumer survey was carried out to discover which home appliance stores are popular with Kiwis wishing to buy products online.

In this Home Appliances and Whiteware Industry Report we discovered:

  • The home appliances and whiteware market is highly competitive, urging players to optimise their RBR to get ahead of their competition.
  • The RBR leader, Harvey Norman, is ahead of its closest competitor, Noel Leeming, by only a small interval. Overall, there are only three companies that have an RBR over 15%, which means that there is a lot of room for growth.
  • More than half of all home appliance and whiteware websites have a low organic RBR score, below 2%. This represents a big opportunity for natural search optimisation.
  • Popular search phrases are missing from most sites and in most cases very little is being done with organic search.
  • The mix of physical and virtual shopping will continue which means retailers must optimise the click and collect capability of their online sites and add more value to normal in-store activities through seamless user experience and aggressive promotional efforts online.
  • A considered search strategy that integrates both organic and paid search should be a key customer acquisition channel for home appliance stores, driving revenue and growing the store’s share of digital spend.

Rankings Based Reach Natural Search

FIRST uses its bespoke metric called RBR (Ranking Based Reach) to estimate how well each company is ranking in search engines. RBR provides a simple way to compare a website’s search engine rankings with its competitors. RBR is an estimate of the percentage of available search traffic a website will receive for a set of phrases – this gives the sites share of search or reach. It is weighted based on the popularity of each search phrase and the relative click through rate (CTR) of each ranking position.

For the full report (PDF) please use our download form

Websites included in this home appliances industry report comparison:

* 100percent.co.nz
* bettaelectrical.co.nz
* briscoes.co.nz
* bunnings.co.nz
* farmers.co.nz
* harveynorman.co.nz
* lvmartin.co.nz
* noelleeming.co.nz
* smithscity.co.nz
* thewarehouse.co.nz

Groceries Online Industry Report – NZ SEO Reach

published by on 24th March 2015 under Industry Reports, Research

Searching for Groceries Online

For the full report (PDF) please use our download form

Which New Zealand Supermarkets are maximising their market share online?

Find out which online grocery stores are taking the lead in organic search and how they’re doing it.

FIRST has investigated the organic search engine rankings for NZ consumer searches focused on buying groceries online, utilising FIRST’s Ranking Based Reach (RBR) analysis framework. In addition, a consumer survey was carried out to discover which supermarkets are popular with Kiwis wishing to buy groceries online.

In this Groceries Industry Report we discovered: 

  • Rankings for grocery-related searches in New Zealand are dominated by CountdownNew World and Pak’nSave. And all three of these have also invested in paid search for incremental clicks.
  • Most grocery retailers, including Countdown, New World and Pak’nSave, have a very low organic RBR score, below 1%. This represents an opportunity for all of them to compete by optimising for highly relevant and popular search phrases.
  • Online grocery shopping in NZ has been on a steady rise over the last decade as consumers are more engaged than ever in buying online. Moreover, the average transaction size is much larger for food and beverages as online shopping offers a greater mix of package sizes and categories (AC Nielsen, 2011).
  • 79% of global respondents indicated that they actively make dietary choices to prevent health conditions. Two-year sales trends support and reveal that healthy food purchases are on the rise. With consumers’ strong interest to be healthy and recent purchasing trends, healthy or good-for-you products are positioned for continued growth (AC Nielsen, 2015). Online supermarkets can take advantage of this trend most especially, Farro Fresh and Nosh Food Market, which are known for their fresh and healthy offerings.
  • Popular search phrases are missing from most sites and very little is being done with organic search.
  • A comprehensive digital search strategy that integrates both organic and paid search, is a key customer acquisition channel for supermarkets, driving revenue and growing the supermarket’s share of digital spend.

 

Rankings Based Reach Natural Search

FIRST uses its bespoke metric called RBR (Ranking Based Reach) to estimate how well each company is ranking in search engines. RBR provides a simple way to compare a website’s search engine rankings with its competitors. RBR is an estimate of the percentage of available search traffic a website will receive for a set of phrases – this gives the sites share of search or reach. It is weighted based on the popularity of each search phrase and the relative click through rate (CTR) of each ranking position.

For the full report (PDF) please use our download form

Websites included in this groceries industry report comparison:

* countdown.co.nz
* farrofresh.co.nz
* foursquare.co.nz
* huckleberryfarms.co.nz
* mightyape.co.nz
* newworld.co.nz
* noshfoodmarket.com
* paknsave.co.nz
* supermarketonline.co.nz
* supervalue.co.nz

Data is of no value unless it is analysed and turned into actionable insights

published by on 22nd January 2015 under Digital Trends, Google Analytics, Research

No Insights? No value

There is no reason why any website shouldn’t have a web analytics tool installed – especially since a tool like Google Analytics is available free of charge.  The data that it can provide is plentiful – almost exhaustive – and can give you amazing information such as visits, bounce rates and other metrics which can give you a good indication of what’s happening when users come to your site

But in looking at all this data, it is important to ask yourself –

What should I do in turning this data into something that will impact my business’ bottom line?

After all, what’s the point in spending valuable time looking at data if you’re not going to pull insights from it that’ll make a business impact (whether it be revenue, enquiries / leads generated – whatever your website goal is)

Below are some points to ensure that your data can indeed make a tangible, measureable impact:

  1. Ensure what you’re measuring (and reporting on) on your website is closely aligned with business objectives – particularly if reporting to stakeholders.  There no quicker way to lose buy-in if you analyse / report on metrics that stakeholders don’t care about
  2. Set up conversion “goals” in your analytics platform – and monitor these closely.  A conversion is an action you want a visitor on your website to undertake (to purchase a product, to download a PDF file etc.) so it makes sense that it’s of high priority focus when analysing your business performance.  Secondary metrics that affect goals (such as visits, bounce rate etc.) can then be analysed to understand what is driving these goals.
  3. The value in analytics is around the insights, not necessarily the data.  And be sure not to confuse the two.  Data is what your analytics tool gives you, insights is how you change that data that has context and meaning
  4. Further to the above, ensure insights pulled are actionable – turning the data into insights then into something actionable is where the value is realised!  A great insight that isn’t actionable will not contribute to the bottom line so is of little or no tangible value
  5. Measure your marketing activity with an ROI (Return on Investment) metric if you’re not doing so already – and compare it across digital channels to identify where you can get the greatest returns.  Marketing budgets are finite so make it work as hard as possible.
  6. Become data driven in your decision making – gut feel can be somewhat subjective.  Using objectivity found in data will solidify reasoning behind your choices and give you confidence when making decisions
  7. Realise that data analytics platforms (such as Google Analytics) gives you quantitative data (‘What’) on how visitors are interacting on your site – but it doesn’t give you qualitative (‘Why’) data.  To get a holistic understand, utilise heat map tools (such as Crazy Egg) to provide context into the data you’re getting

We’ve heard about ‘data’ and ‘big data’ being the next big thing – in a way, it’s already here – but realise that data is not valuable unless it’s turned into actionable insights.  Turn this into a competitive advantage for your business and realise the true power of analytics.

 

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Digital Marketing in NZ: Breakthroughs I’d like to see in 2015

published by on 16th December 2014 under Digital Strategy, Digital Trends, Technology

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It’s that time of year again… when the digital community are making predictions on the technologies
and tactics that will be HOT next year. While these predictions may or may not be realised, here are breakthroughs I believe New Zealand businesses should be making right now (and in 2015) to remain competitive, no matter what.

 

  1. Digital transformation needs to be driven from the top. Digital expertise at C-Level and on company advisory boards is a must.
  2. Online business must have a clear value proposition. We have too many ‘me too’ online businesses. Differentiate and stand for something. What is it that you do better than anybody else out there? Compete on more than just price.
  3. The international threat to New Zealand eCommerce Retail is real. New Zealand retailers must recognise this and think bigger. As it has been said, sometimes the best defence is a good offence. Although based in NZ, businesses must take advantage of global marketplaces to drive growth.
  4. A great customer database is a must. The more segmented and personalised the better. I am amazed at how many companies in NZ are still not sending relevant, customised communications by email. The technology exists to do so. Take advantage of it.
  5. People with good digital expertise in NZ are scarce. Perhaps companies should focus on core business and outsource to ‘best of breed’ companies those things that can be outsourced. A good external partner can be significantly more valuable to driving growth than the wrong internal hire.
  6. Recognize speed, agility and innovation are competitive weapons. The ability of a business to learn, adapt, test and optimize is a key determining factor on where they will be in the market 12 months from now.
  7. Businesses must leverage technologies and automation where possible to gain efficiency and increase effectiveness. Often with our No.8 wire mentality, NZ business are slow to invest and just make do. Don’t let that thinking hurt your growth opportunities.
  8. Companies must do a better job at listening to and learning from customers. Work to improve the customer experience across devices and channels. This should be ‘always on’, not a one-time event.
  9. Live, breathe and understand your organization’s digital data. Become expert in finding insights in that data. But most importantly, act on that data and improve business and marketing performance.
  10. Know why you are employing various digital tactics. Ask the ‘why?’. Focus on what will make the biggest difference. Don’t waste time on things that don’t matter.

 

Too often we busy ourselves with various digital marketing tactics when many of the larger questions remain unanswered. In 2015, lets do the basics right. Let’s lift our game and compete effectively online.

Searching for toys online – NZ toys industry SEO report

published by on 28th November 2014 under Industry Reports, Research

Toys seo industry report

For the full report (PDF) please use our download form

Which toy stores are maximising their market share online?

Find out which stores are taking the lead in the toy industry in organic search and how they’re doing it.

FIRST has investigated the organic search engine rankings for NZ consumer searches focused on buying toys online in New Zealand, utilising FIRST’s Ranking Based Reach (RBR) analysis framework. In addition, a consumer survey was carried out to discover where Kiwis go first to find new or used toys and what is most important for them when ordering toys online.

In this report we discovered

  • Toyworld is leading the RBR in organic desktop search, leaving Mighty Ape and Fishpond quite a bit behind. In mobile the picture seems quite similar, with a bigger change at Bebabo which wins six positions in mobile. 
  • In general, search results are broadly dispersed among a wide range of competitors. In this competitive market, a few toy stores have recognized the urgency of ranking well in organic search, nevertheless there are still many companies which are not at all present within natural search. 
  • We discovered that toy-related search terms show seasonal peaks in November and December. Therefore, optimising search strategies according to consumers seasonal search behaviour (and special occasions) is a key requirement to sell more. 
  • In our survey we revealed that most people would search on Trade Me first to find toys online, followed by 26% of Kiwis who would directly go to the website of a known toy store. Moreover we discovered that the “Quality of the toy” was considered as the most important factor when ordering toys online. 
  • A digital strategy that integrates both organic and paid search should be a key customer acquisition and revenue driver for toy stores.

 

rbr seo industry report new

 

FIRST uses its bespoke metric called RBR (Ranking Based Reach) to estimate how well each company is ranking in search engines. RBR provides a simple way to compare a website’s search engine rankings with its competitors. RBR is an estimate of the percentage of available search traffic a website will receive for a set of phrases – this gives the sites share of search or reach. It is weighted based on the popularity of each search phrase and the relative click through rate (CTR) of each ranking position.

For the full report (PDF) please use our download form

Websites included in this toy stores SEO industry report comparison:

* fishpond.co.nz
* iqtoys.co.nz
* toyco.co.nz
* toyplanet.co.nz
* toyworld.co.nz
* thewarehouse.co.nz
* trademe.co.nz
* mightyape.co.nz
* farmers.co.nz/toys
* bebabo.co.nz
* babycity.co.nz
* jumpinjacks.co.nz
* funtoy.co.nz
* crackerjacktoys.co.nz
* babyfactory.co.nz
* toysrus.com
* babystuff.co.nz

* includes all websites under the relevant domain name (eg, including www.)

 

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