Consumer Electronics Online Industry Report – NZ

published by on 27th March 2015 under Industry Reports, Research

Searching for consumer electronics online

For the full report (PDF) please use our download form

Which New Zealand Consumer Electronics online stores are maximising their market share online?

Find out which consumer electronics online stores are taking the lead in organic search and how they’re doing it. FIRST has investigated the organic search engine rankings for NZ consumer searches focused on buying consumer electronics, utilising FIRST’s Ranking Based Reach (RBR) analysis framework. In addition, a consumer survey was carried out to discover which consumer electronics stores are popular with Kiwis wishing to buy products online.

 In this Consumer Electronics Online Industry Report we discovered:

  • The performance of the consumer electronics market is forecasted to increase to a value of NZD $570.1 million by the end of 2018 (Market Line, 2014) and thus there will be a need for online search results optimisation to remain competitive among New Zealand online consumers.
  • “The global wearables market (e.g. fitbit and smartwatches) will grow at a CAGR (Compound Annual Growth Rate) of 35% over the next five years, and by 2019 the enterprise wearables market will be worth $18 billion, says Gartner (IT Brief, 2015).”
  • There was a dramatic increase for the search term ‘smartwatch’ among New Zealand consumers since March 2013 and has been constantly increasing over the past two years. Additionally, there was a notable uplift for the search term ‘fitbit’ among New Zealand consumers since November 2014 which points directly to the need and significance of adopting quickly and maximising search engine optimisation.
  • While Dick Smith is the RBR leader, its RBR score is below 15%. Majority of the analysed consumer electronics retailers have low RBR scores. There is significant opportunity for these retailers to improve their RBR or search engine reach for important and popular keywords in organic search.
  • Popular search phrases are missing from most sites and in most cases very little is being done with organic search. By improving their RBR score, they will be able to seize opportunities to boost online sales revenues.
  • A considered search strategy that integrates both organic and paid search should be a key customer acquisition channel for consumer electronic online stores, driving revenue and growing the stores share of digital spend. 

Rankings Based Reach Natural Search

FIRST uses its bespoke metric called RBR (Ranking Based Reach) to estimate how well each company is ranking in search engines. RBR provides a simple way to compare a website’s search engine rankings with its competitors. RBR is an estimate of the percentage of available search traffic a website will receive for a set of phrases – this gives the sites share of search or reach. It is weighted based on the popularity of each search phrase and the relative click through rate (CTR) of each ranking position.

For the full report (PDF) please use our download form

Websites included in this consumer electronics online industry report comparison:
* dicksmith.co.nz
* globalpc.co.nz
* harveynorman.co.nz
* jaycar.co.nz
* jbhifi.co.nz
* mightyape.co.nz
* noelleeming.co.nz
* pbtech.co.nz
* thewarehouse.co.nz
* wiseguys.co.nz

Home Loans Online Industry Report – NZ

published by on under Industry Reports, Research

Searching for home loans online

For the full report (PDF) please use our download form

Which New Zealand Home Loan providers are maximising their market share online?

Find out which home loan providers are taking the lead in organic search and how they’re doing it.
FIRST has investigated the organic search engine rankings for NZ consumer searches focused on home loans, utilising FIRST’s Ranking Based Reach (RBR) analysis framework. In addition, a consumer survey was carried out to discover what is most important for Kiwis wishing to apply for a home loan.

 In this Home Loans Industry Report we discovered:

  • The RBR leader, Westpac, is ahead of its competitors with a score of 48%. ANZ and Kiwibank are catching up while ASB , BNZ and TSB are lagging behind. The majority of non-bank lenders have a very low RBR score of less than 3%.
  • There is still a lot of room for growth for both bank and non-bank lenders as all of them have an RBR score of less than 50%. Without improving their RBR reach presence, they are missing opportunities for potential home loan sales.
  • Given relatively low RBR scores, search results are broadly dispersed among a wide range of competitors. In this competitive industry, retailers are missing out optimising on the most cost effective marketing channel – search.
  • There was a significant uplift for the search term ‘loan repayment calculator’ among New Zealand customers over the last 12 months. Companies not ranking for this term in the Google search engine are limiting their possibilities for visitors from search.
  • Popular search phrases are missing from most sites and in most cases very little is being done with organic search.
  • To remain competitive in the home loan market, banks and non-banks must focus on providing quality and positive online customer experience.
  • A considered digital strategy that integrates both organic and paid search should be a key customer acquisition and revenue driver for home loan providers.

Rankings Based Reach Natural Search

FIRST uses its bespoke metric called RBR (Ranking Based Reach) to estimate how well each company is ranking in search engines. RBR provides a simple way to compare a website’s search engine rankings with its competitors. RBR is an estimate of the percentage of available search traffic a website will receive for a set of phrases – this gives the sites share of search or reach. It is weighted based on the popularity of each search phrase and the relative click through rate (CTR) of each ranking position.

For the full report (PDF) please use our download form

Websites included in this home loans online industry report comparison:
* amp.co.nz
* anz.co.nz
* asb.co.nz
* bnz.co.nz
* kiwibank.co.nz
* mikepero.co.nz
* roost.co.nz
* sovereign.co.nz
* tsbbank.co.nz
* westpac.co.nz

 

Home Appliances and Whiteware Industry Report – NZ SEO Reach

published by on under Industry Reports, Research

Searching for Home Appliances Online

For the full report (PDF) please use our download form

Which New Zealand Home Appliance stores are maximising their market share online?

Find out which online home appliance and whiteware stores are taking the lead in organic search and how they’re doing it.

FIRST has investigated the organic search engine rankings for NZ consumer searches focused on buying home appliances and whiteware, utilising FIRST’s Ranking Based Reach (RBR) analysis framework. In addition, a consumer survey was carried out to discover which home appliance stores are popular with Kiwis wishing to buy products online.

In this Home Appliances and Whiteware Industry Report we discovered:

  • The home appliances and whiteware market is highly competitive, urging players to optimise their RBR to get ahead of their competition.
  • The RBR leader, Harvey Norman, is ahead of its closest competitor, Noel Leeming, by only a small interval. Overall, there are only three companies that have an RBR over 15%, which means that there is a lot of room for growth.
  • More than half of all home appliance and whiteware websites have a low organic RBR score, below 2%. This represents a big opportunity for natural search optimisation.
  • Popular search phrases are missing from most sites and in most cases very little is being done with organic search.
  • The mix of physical and virtual shopping will continue which means retailers must optimise the click and collect capability of their online sites and add more value to normal in-store activities through seamless user experience and aggressive promotional efforts online.
  • A considered search strategy that integrates both organic and paid search should be a key customer acquisition channel for home appliance stores, driving revenue and growing the store’s share of digital spend.

Rankings Based Reach Natural Search

FIRST uses its bespoke metric called RBR (Ranking Based Reach) to estimate how well each company is ranking in search engines. RBR provides a simple way to compare a website’s search engine rankings with its competitors. RBR is an estimate of the percentage of available search traffic a website will receive for a set of phrases – this gives the sites share of search or reach. It is weighted based on the popularity of each search phrase and the relative click through rate (CTR) of each ranking position.

For the full report (PDF) please use our download form

Websites included in this home appliances industry report comparison:

* 100percent.co.nz
* bettaelectrical.co.nz
* briscoes.co.nz
* bunnings.co.nz
* farmers.co.nz
* harveynorman.co.nz
* lvmartin.co.nz
* noelleeming.co.nz
* smithscity.co.nz
* thewarehouse.co.nz

Groceries Online Industry Report – NZ SEO Reach

published by on 24th March 2015 under Industry Reports, Research

Searching for Groceries Online

For the full report (PDF) please use our download form

Which New Zealand Supermarkets are maximising their market share online?

Find out which online grocery stores are taking the lead in organic search and how they’re doing it.

FIRST has investigated the organic search engine rankings for NZ consumer searches focused on buying groceries online, utilising FIRST’s Ranking Based Reach (RBR) analysis framework. In addition, a consumer survey was carried out to discover which supermarkets are popular with Kiwis wishing to buy groceries online.

In this Groceries Industry Report we discovered: 

  • Rankings for grocery-related searches in New Zealand are dominated by CountdownNew World and Pak’nSave. And all three of these have also invested in paid search for incremental clicks.
  • Most grocery retailers, including Countdown, New World and Pak’nSave, have a very low organic RBR score, below 1%. This represents an opportunity for all of them to compete by optimising for highly relevant and popular search phrases.
  • Online grocery shopping in NZ has been on a steady rise over the last decade as consumers are more engaged than ever in buying online. Moreover, the average transaction size is much larger for food and beverages as online shopping offers a greater mix of package sizes and categories (AC Nielsen, 2011).
  • 79% of global respondents indicated that they actively make dietary choices to prevent health conditions. Two-year sales trends support and reveal that healthy food purchases are on the rise. With consumers’ strong interest to be healthy and recent purchasing trends, healthy or good-for-you products are positioned for continued growth (AC Nielsen, 2015). Online supermarkets can take advantage of this trend most especially, Farro Fresh and Nosh Food Market, which are known for their fresh and healthy offerings.
  • Popular search phrases are missing from most sites and very little is being done with organic search.
  • A comprehensive digital search strategy that integrates both organic and paid search, is a key customer acquisition channel for supermarkets, driving revenue and growing the supermarket’s share of digital spend.

 

Rankings Based Reach Natural Search

FIRST uses its bespoke metric called RBR (Ranking Based Reach) to estimate how well each company is ranking in search engines. RBR provides a simple way to compare a website’s search engine rankings with its competitors. RBR is an estimate of the percentage of available search traffic a website will receive for a set of phrases – this gives the sites share of search or reach. It is weighted based on the popularity of each search phrase and the relative click through rate (CTR) of each ranking position.

For the full report (PDF) please use our download form

Websites included in this groceries industry report comparison:

* countdown.co.nz
* farrofresh.co.nz
* foursquare.co.nz
* huckleberryfarms.co.nz
* mightyape.co.nz
* newworld.co.nz
* noshfoodmarket.com
* paknsave.co.nz
* supermarketonline.co.nz
* supervalue.co.nz

Data is of no value unless it is analysed and turned into actionable insights

published by on 22nd January 2015 under Digital Trends, Google Analytics, Research

No Insights? No value

There is no reason why any website shouldn’t have a web analytics tool installed – especially since a tool like Google Analytics is available free of charge.  The data that it can provide is plentiful – almost exhaustive – and can give you amazing information such as visits, bounce rates and other metrics which can give you a good indication of what’s happening when users come to your site

But in looking at all this data, it is important to ask yourself –

What should I do in turning this data into something that will impact my business’ bottom line?

After all, what’s the point in spending valuable time looking at data if you’re not going to pull insights from it that’ll make a business impact (whether it be revenue, enquiries / leads generated – whatever your website goal is)

Below are some points to ensure that your data can indeed make a tangible, measureable impact:

  1. Ensure what you’re measuring (and reporting on) on your website is closely aligned with business objectives – particularly if reporting to stakeholders.  There no quicker way to lose buy-in if you analyse / report on metrics that stakeholders don’t care about
  2. Set up conversion “goals” in your analytics platform – and monitor these closely.  A conversion is an action you want a visitor on your website to undertake (to purchase a product, to download a PDF file etc.) so it makes sense that it’s of high priority focus when analysing your business performance.  Secondary metrics that affect goals (such as visits, bounce rate etc.) can then be analysed to understand what is driving these goals.
  3. The value in analytics is around the insights, not necessarily the data.  And be sure not to confuse the two.  Data is what your analytics tool gives you, insights is how you change that data that has context and meaning
  4. Further to the above, ensure insights pulled are actionable – turning the data into insights then into something actionable is where the value is realised!  A great insight that isn’t actionable will not contribute to the bottom line so is of little or no tangible value
  5. Measure your marketing activity with an ROI (Return on Investment) metric if you’re not doing so already – and compare it across digital channels to identify where you can get the greatest returns.  Marketing budgets are finite so make it work as hard as possible.
  6. Become data driven in your decision making – gut feel can be somewhat subjective.  Using objectivity found in data will solidify reasoning behind your choices and give you confidence when making decisions
  7. Realise that data analytics platforms (such as Google Analytics) gives you quantitative data (‘What’) on how visitors are interacting on your site – but it doesn’t give you qualitative (‘Why’) data.  To get a holistic understand, utilise heat map tools (such as Crazy Egg) to provide context into the data you’re getting

We’ve heard about ‘data’ and ‘big data’ being the next big thing – in a way, it’s already here – but realise that data is not valuable unless it’s turned into actionable insights.  Turn this into a competitive advantage for your business and realise the true power of analytics.

 

Related posts